2017-02-12 17:31:25 Writen By: Hatton By Design

Diamond Shapes

shapes of diamondsThe Shape of Diamonds explained

The choice of shape of any diamond is a personal decision and must be taken with consideration to the particular ring, necklace or other piece of jewellery that it is a part of. All the diamonds that you will find on the Hatton by Design website will be described as one of the core, standard shapes, and here we explain exactly what each of the popular diamond shape styles means.

Follow this link to experiment with our ring builder tool to see which you prefer. All our diamond jewellery is hand-crafted in Hatton Garden, London, so if you cannot find the shape you are looking for, please contact us and we will be delighted to source it for you; and give advice of the best way to mount it.


 

 

 BRILLIANT ROUND CUT DIAMONDS

round cut diamondIf you are looking for a traditional engagement ring then a brilliant round cut is the most popular option, making up about three quarters of all diamonds sold. The diamond is cut in the shape of a cone with the top rounded off enabling it to return the light that enters it, giving it that brilliant sparkle. 

Due to the geometry of the round cut on a pyramid, this shaped diamond generally has a superior light reflection than others; hence its popularity. Nearly all round diamonds are called brilliant which is a reference to the fact that they are created with 58 facets (individual sides or faces of the finished diamond) 


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Chloe diamond engagement ring

{image: 'Chloe' engagement ring in white gold shows off a brilliant cut diamond}

PRINCESS CUT DIAMONDS

 

Princess cut diamondCreated in the 1970s, this modern style is adapted from a standard brilliant round cut diamond. The princess cut highlights the diamond's fire, the dispersed light that appears as flashes of rainbow colours. The top of a princess cut diamond is square with pointed corners, and the general shape is that of a pyramid. Radiating fire and brilliance, princess cut diamond engagement rings are a contemporary alternative to the classic brilliant round diamond engagement ring. 

Created in the 1970s, this modern style is adapted from a standard brilliant round cut diamond. The princess cut highlights the diamond's fire, the dispersed light that appears as flashes of rainbow colours. The top of a princess cut diamond is square with pointed corners, and the general shape is that of a pyramid. Radiating fire and brilliance, princess cut diamond engagement rings are a contemporary alternative to the classic brilliant round diamond engagement ring.

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Imogen engagement ring
{image: A princess cut diamond on a Rose Gold 'Imogen' engagement ring}

 



 EMERALD CUT DIAMONDS

 

Emerald cut diamond

As its name implies, this method of cutting was originally used for the cutting of emeralds. The emerald cut diamond is designed to draw attention to a diamond's shine. It is a step cut – a cut with rectangular facets that are arranged parallel to each edge of the diamond. An emerald cut diamond has a rectangular top with chiselled corners. This shape is enjoying a huge revival in diamond jewellery.

An emerald cut diamond will tend to reflect light in long lines rather than a fiery glisten.



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Eloise engagement ring

{image: 'Eloise' yellow gold engagement ring with a horizontal set emerald cut diamond}


 


 OVAL CUT DIAMONDS

 

Oval cut diamondAn oval cut diamond engagement ring is perfect for someone who adores the fire of the brilliant round diamond, but wants something that is slightly different. The oval shape was designed in the 1960s by Lazare Kaplan, the cousin of Marcel Tolkowsky who aided the development of brilliant round diamonds.

 

There is no set narrowness of an oval diamond cut and the choice is much of a personal one. Oval diamonds are often used to fool the eye into thinking the diamond is larger than it is! Another use is to align the diamond on a ring lengthways so as to give the appearance of a more slender finger. 

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Charlotte diamond engagement ring

{image: 'Charlotte' yellow gold engagement ring}

 MARQUISE CUT DIAMONDS

 

Marquise cut diamondIt is said that the marquise shape was created at the request of King Louis XIV, who wanted a stone to represent the sultry smile of his mistress, the Marquise de Pompadour. The result of this request was a lengthened shape in a diamond cut with sharp ends. The marquise diamond is cut to exploit its carat weight, giving a superior looking stone.

 

As with an oval cut diamond, the marquise cut is used to make the wearer’s finger appear slimmer, and carat-for-carat, gives one of the largest surface areas of a diamond’s crown.


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Sophie diamond engagement ring

{image: Marquise diamond on a 'Sophie' white gold engagement ring}

 


PEAR (or TEARDROP) CUT DIAMONDS 

 

Pear cut diamondThis unique shape is also known as a teardrop diamond; it has a single point with a rounded end and exudes sophistication. The pear-shaped diamond is a brilliant cut diamond that blends the shape of an oval diamond and a marquise diamond. Set within an engagement ring this can be worn towards or away from the hand depending on the preference of the wearer. Either way it is sure to capture people’s attention.

 

When purchasing a pear cut diamond you should look for symmetry as a sign of a good quality cut.

 

The length-to-width ratio can vary significantly and is purely a matter of personal preference, often dictated by the intended use: a solitaire engagement ring will tend to be ‘fatter’ whilst teardrop diamond earrings will have a more slender feel to them.

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Rebecca Engagement Ring

{image: 'Rebecca' white gold engagement ring, which can be worn with the diamond facing towrds or away from the wearer}

 


 ASSCHER CUT DIAMONDS

Asscher diamondThis unique shape is also known as a teardrop diamond, it has a single point with a rounded end and exudes sophistication. The pear shaped diamond is a brilliant cut diamond that blends the shape of an oval diamond and a marquise diamond. Set within an engagement ring this can be worn towards or away from the hand depending on the preference of the wearer. Either way it is sure to capture people’s attention.

 

When purchasing a pear cut diamond you should look for symmetry as a sign of a good quality cut.

 

 The length-to-width ratio can vary significantly and is purely a matter of personal preference, often dictated by the intended use: a solitaire engagement ring will tend to be ‘fatter’ whilst teardrop diamond earrings will have a more slender feel to them.


HEART CUT DIAMONDS

 

Heart cut diamondAn unmistakable shape, the heart shape diamond is favoured on pendants where they can be worn close to the wearer’s own heart. Of course, as the traditional symbol of love, heart shape diamonds are also popular as solitaire rings and as earrings.

 

When buying a heart shaped diamond, it is important to ensure the symmetry of the two opposite sides of the heart. Also, the most pleasing proportion tends to be when the width and the height are of similar measurements, otherwise the heart can look a little elongated or squat.

 

Size is important with a heart, don’t go too small otherwise you will start to lose the definition of the shape of the heart.


 RADIANT CUT DIAMONDS

 

Radiant cut diamondThe first square shaped diamond to achieve a brilliant cut across both the pavilion and the crown is the radiant cut diamond. Visually the radiant cut mostly differs from a princess cut diamond in that it has cropped corners. The shape of a radiant diamond ranges from perfectly square to rectangular, the latter being popular with those who like the shape of an emerald cut diamond but prefer the brilliance created by a radiant cut diamond.

 

As the prongs on the setting often cover the corners, it is often difficult to distinguish a radiant cut diamond to a princess cut diamond.






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